A Unique Way to Share Jesus

In Your Bible: Acts 17: 16-34

Paul was whisked away from Berea to Athens. There he saw idols everywhere in this great university city. However, the Athenians didn’t have a clue about the Most-High God. Paul told them of God’s purpose through Jesus.

Paul Reasoned with the Council

Paul’s spirit was deeply troubled when he saw Athens full of idols. That gave him a unique way to share Jesus with the Jews in the Synagogue, the God-fearing Gentiles, with those in the market-place, and now with the high council.

The high council of the city [the Areopagus in Greek] – a select group of about 30 members * was intrigued at what they heard from Paul. “Come tell us about this new teaching,” they said. “You are saying some rather strange things, and we must know what it’s all about” (Acts 17:19b,20 NLT).

He told them they were wise to honor an unknown god, but there was much more they were missing. This was Paul’s perfect opening to reason at length about what God did for mankind through Jesus. He commended them for being religious and showed them a better way.

God’s Purpose

Paul proclaimed that God, the Most-High God, made the world and everything in it – including man. God’s purpose was for nations to seek and find him – for he is not far from any one of us. For in him we live and move and exist. (Acts 17: 27b, 28a NLT).

When Paul explained about the resurrection of the dead [God raising Jesus from the dead], some laughed in contempt but others said, “We want to hear more about this later” (Acts 17:32 NLT). And some eagerly believed. Paul told them of God’s purpose through Jesus.

Prayer: Father, continue to give me unique ways to use circumstances to show the joy of knowing Jesus.

Questions: How does Paul’s mentioning of nations seeking after God and finding him, relate to individuals needing to seek after God for themselves? Has God given you unique or surprising ways to share Jesus?

* The Daily Bible Series, Acts of the Apostles, William Barclay, The Westminster Press, Philadelphia, 1955, pp. 141, 142.

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